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Microenterprise Loan Program

 

Frequently asked questions

What does microenterprise mean?
What makes this program special?
You'll work with me when my bank won't?
Can I get free money to start my business?
How much can I borrow?

What if I need a larger loan?

Tell me more about standard loans.
Tell me more about express loans.
How much interest do you charge?
Do I have to put up collateral?
How long will I have to pay you back?
Do I have to be incorporated to borrow money?
How do I know if I qualify?

Can I use the loan to start a new business?

Will you lend me money to buy a business or a franchise?
My credit's not great because of some past mistakes. Can I still borrow money?
What if I can't pay you back?
How long before I can get my money?
If I apply and you turn me down, will that show up on my credit record?
If I apply, who else will see it?
Does the Rural Center offer other programs to assist entrepreneurs?

How do I apply?

What does microenterprise mean?
Microenterprises are our smallest businesses, commonly called mom-and-pop businesses. Often, microenterprise is just one, self-employed person, and usually it will have no more than 10 employees.

Return to the top

What makes this program special?
We work with people who have good ideas and sound character, but may have difficulty obtaining a loan from traditional sources. In addition, our most popular product — an express loan — can be approved within five business days. Program staff work one-on-one with potential borrowers to prepare loan applications based on the borrower's business plan, character and the local economy. Technical assistance is offered in partnerships with Small Business Centers at area community colleges or the Small Business and Technology Development Center of the UNC system.
Return to the top

You'll work with me when my bank won't?
Often, we can. We do this by working closely with you and incorporating business assistance into the loan process. 
Return to the top

Can I get free money to start my business?
We offer business loans, not grants. We charge interest and expect the loan to be paid back on time. Generally, you’ll find that grants are available only for government agencies or nonprofits, not for private, for-profit businesses.
Return to the top

How much can I borrow?
That varies. The maximum available through our program is $25,000. Express loans are capped at $5,000. If you already have a micro loan, you must pay it off in full before applying for a new loan.
Return to the top

 

  What if I need a larger loan?

We can direct you to other programs and lenders. Among them, our North Carolina Small Business Credit Initiative is helping traditional lenders make more capital available for startups and expansions. Another program that can open doors is the Capital Access Network, a state initiative to connect small and medium-size businesses with capital opportunities. Other sources are listed here.

Return to the top

 

Tell me more about standard loans.

Standard loans may be issued for up to $25,000. Repayment terms range from three to five years. Loan decisions are generally made within 10 to 20 business days of receiving an application (the same application is used for all microenterprise loans). Requirements increase with the size of the loan amount.

Return to the top


Tell me more about express loans.
Our most popular loan product, express loans may be issued for $500 to $5,000. Repayment terms range from one year to three years. Loan decisions are generally made within five business days of receiving a complete application (the same application is used for all microenterprise loans). Although the application process is abbreviated, you will still be expected to prove credit-worthiness. Requirements increase with the size of the loan amount.
Return to the top


How much interest do you charge?
The interest rate on standard and express loans is prime plus 4 percent. The interest rate on green loans is the current prime rate.
Return to the top

Do I have to put up collateral?
Yes. Acceptable forms of collateral include a vehicle title, equipment, inventory or a deed of trust.
Return to the top

How long will I have to pay you back?
The maximum loan term is five years. Your actual term will fall between one year and five years, depending on the amount of your loan.
Return to the top

Do I have to be incorporated to borrow money?
No. We fund any legal, for-profit entity, and many of our borrowers are sole proprietors.
Return to the top

How do I know if I qualify?
The only way to be sure is to apply. Our basic requirements are:

  • You wish to start or expand a small business.
  • Your business is located in one of the 85 rural counties of North Carolina.
  • Your business has fewer than 10 full-time employees.
  • You have a credit score of at least 575 with no outstanding judgments or liens.
  • You're at least 18 years old.
  • You're a U.S. citizen/permanent resident and resident of North Carolina.
  • Your total project cost does not exceed $50,000.
  • And, of course, you have to have a sound business idea.

Return to the top

 Can I use the loan to start a new business?

Yes. Most of our loans go toward start-ups. We also fund existing businesses.

Return to the top


Will you lend me money to buy a business or a franchise?
This is an acceptable use of a micro loan, but with a qualification. Our loan cap is $25,000, and your total project can cost no more than $50,000.
Return to the top


My credit's not great because of some past mistakes. Can I still borrow money?
We can work with you to improve your score. Before you're eligible for a loan, you'll have to get the score to at least 575 with no outstanding judgments or liens.
Return to the top

What if I can't pay you back?
When you take out a loan, you are expected to pay it back in full, with interest. The collateral you put up is security against the possibility of default. If your cash is short, we can claim the collateral property. This is an added reason for you to consider carefully before taking out a loan and to work hard to make sure your business succeeds.
Return to the top

How long before I can get my money?
The approval process for an express loan ($5,000 maximum) is five business days. Other loans generally require 10 to 20 business days for approval. Once approved, you should receive a check in about a week.
Return to the top

If I apply and you turn me down, will that show up on my credit record?
No information will show up on your credit report except an inquiry for credit.
Return to the top


If I apply, who else will see it?

All information contained in the pre-application and application will be kept strictly confidential and will not be used for any other purpose.
Return to the top

 

Does the Rural Center offer other programs to assist entrepreneurs?

Yes. For laid-off workers, Project GATE or Growing America through Entrepreneurship holds potential. It offers business coaching and training to help you get a business off the ground. Young adults 18 to 30 interested in starting a business may receive specialized assistance through the New Generation Ventures program. The Institute for Rural Entrepreneurship also may be able to refer you to useful resources in your community.

Return to the top

How do I apply?

You may apply to the Rural Center or work through one of our lending partners. The first step is to complete a pre-application. It will help us determine whether the Microenterprise Loan Program or another business finance option might best suit your needs. If a micro loan is a good option, we'll refer you to one of our 78 lending partners who will help you complete a full application. If you don't already have one, you'll also need to write a business plan. The Small Business Center Network of the N.C. Community College System offers business-planning guides for start-ups and established businesses. Other guides may also be found here.

Return to the top

 

 

 

Grant/Loan Applications and Reporting Forms

Welcome. For your convenience we have arranged all grant applications, reporting forms and related materials by program. You may scroll down the page to find the forms you need, or click on the name of the program you’re interested in. If you represent a nonprofit organization that received a Rural Center grant, please note the special section of Nonprofit Compliance Forms.


Building Reuse and Restoration Grants

Rural Hope

Microenterprise Loans
Community Development Corporation Grants
Economic Innovation Grants
N.C. Small Towns Economic Prosperity Grants

New Generation Initiative

OICs

Rural Community Mobilization Project
Water and Sewer Grants
Nonprofit Compliance Forms
Financial Request Form

Statement of No Overdue Taxes Form

 

 

Building Reuse and Restoration Grants


Payment request and progress report forms
Building Reuse/Rural Health Financial Request Form (Excel)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Financial Request Guidelines  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Progress Reporting Form  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health FINAL Reporting Form  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Job Verification Guidelines (Word)
Return to top of page

 

Microenterprise Loans

Microenterprise Pre-application and Credit Report Request (PDF)

Microenterprise Loan Application (Word)
Microenterprise Program Loan Cash Flow Form (Excel)
Return to top of page

 

Community Development Corporation Grants


Reporting forms

CDC Financial Request Form (Excel)

CDC Quarterly Progress Reporting Form (Word)

2013 CDC Match Report (Excel)

CDC Schedule of Due Dates (Excel)

2012 Year End Measuring Progress Report (Word)

2013 CDC Application Budget (Excel)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Return to top of page

 

Economic Innovation Grants

Reporting forms
Economic Innovation Grants Quarterly Progress Report (Word)

Economic Innovation Grants Final Report Template (Word)

Economic Innovation Grants Economic Impact Assessment Template (Word)
If applicable, also see Nonprofit Compliance Forms

See Financial Request Form

Return to top of page

 

N.C. Small Towns Economic Prosperity Grants

Reporting forms
Monthly Planning Report (Word)
Planning Final Report  (Word)

Monthly Implementation Report (Word)

Implementation Final Report (Word)

STEP Planning Financial Report Form (Excel)

STEP Implementation Financial Report Form (Excel)

STEP Match Report (Excel)

2012 STEP Planning Reporting Schedule (Excel)


Return to top of page

 

New Generation Initiative

Reporting forms

New Generation Careers program reporting requirements (Recorded webinar)

New Generation Leaders Budget Form (Excel)

New Generation Leaders Financial Request Form (Excel)

New Generations Leaders Match Report (Excel)

New Generations Leaders Match Report - Example (Excel)

New Generation Leaders Schedule of Due Dates (Word)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

 

Rural Community Mobilization Project

Reporting Forms

Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Return to top of page

 

Water and Sewer Grants

Economic Infrastructure Program Payment Request and Progress Reporting Forms
Financial Payment Request Checklist for Grantees  (Word)
Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)
Quarterly & Final Report (Word)
Conflict of Interest Statement  (Word)
If applicable, also see Nonprofit Compliance Forms

 

Planning, Supplemental, Unsewered Communities Grant Programs

Financial Request and Reporting Form with instructions (Excel)
Financial Payment Request Checklist (Word)
Quarterly & Final Report (Word)
Conflict of Interest Statement (Word)
Capital Improvement Plan General Guideline (PDF)
Minority Business Statement from General Statute 143-128 (PDF)

Unsewered Communities Grant Program Only
Project Budget (Word)
Project Schedule (Word)

 

Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Certification and Sworn Statement (Word)
State Grants Compliance Reporting: Receipt of $25,000 or more (Word)
State Grants Compliance Reporting: Receipt of less than $25,000 (Word)
Program Activities and Accomplishments (Word)
Schedule of Receipts and Expenditures (Excel)
Return to top of page

 

Financial Request Form and Instructions

Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)

 

Statement of No Overdue Tax

Statement of No Overdue Tax Form (Word)

 

Return to top of page

 

Grant helps hardware store reclaim vacant building

Main Street building during renovationSCOTLAND NECK -- It was incredibly cheap -- just $6,000 -- but Isaac Hanff did not buy the crumbling, three-story building on Main Street because he could snap it up for less than what he'd pay for a used car.

 

Hanff is a Scotland Neck native who remembers when the town bubbled with the energy that steady factory paychecks provide. Bustling businesses lined the town's economic corridor.

 

The building he owns at 1000 Main Street over the years housed businesses that sold everything from clothes and appliances to horse carriages and caskets.

 

The decline of manufacturing and textiles has led to downtown becoming dotted with empty buildings. Hanff bought one of the largest ones, even though pigeons camped out on the third floor and holes in the roof had led to severe water damage. The building dates to the 1880s.

 

"I didn't want to see it fall down," he said.

 

With help from a $60,000 building reuse grant the Rural Center, Hanff worked to renovate the ground floor of the vacant eyesore into Hometown Hardware & General Store, which opened in 2011.

Hardware store operator Holten Williams

 

Scotland Neck Police Chief Joe D. Williams Jr. runs the business with this son, Holten. They sell hand-dipped ice cream, retro candies and pickled pigs feet alongside hammers and paint and building supplies, replicating the feel of an old-time mercantile center. 

 

With gasoline prices high, Williams said there is a market in town for people who don't want to drive to Roanoke Rapids or Tarboro to visit the nearest hardware store. "On those road trips, you're going to burn 50 miles to get a half-pound of nails," he said.

  

 Logging class trains next generation of cutters

 

Before he endeavored to start a new career, Wesley Jackson worked as a contractor installing satellite dishes. Working independently, it was up to Jackson to pay for all the supplies he needed to complete the installations, including the gasoline he put in his truck.

 

"I owed more money than I was making," said Jackson, who is 49. "At my age I'm looking for security and better benefits."

 

So Jackson signed up to learn the logging trade, enrolling in a 16-week class developed through a collaboration of the N.C. Association of Professional Loggers, Pitt Community College and the N.C. Agromedicine Institute. The Rural Center awarded the program $50,000 from the Rural Community Mobilization program, which assists community organizations connecting job-seekers with jobs – and sometimes with new career paths.

 

The Rural Center grant was combined with awards from the Golden LEAF Foundation and the Biofuels Center of North Carolina. Caterpillar Forest Products donated the use of heavy equipment. The grants enable students to enroll in the course tuition-free.

 


Each of the 14 students was unemployed when it began. The logging class consists of eight weeks of classroom sessions, which includes an emphasis onimproving students' money-management and job interview skills, followed by eight weeks in the forest. When they complete the course, students will be qualified for entry-level work as forest equipment operators.

 

The students expressed optimism about the future of the logging industry and their places in it.

 "When the industry turns hot again, these guys will be ready to run with it," says Bryan Wagner

"I like being outside. I like big trucks, to tell you the truth," said Donna Chaffee, who is 47 and the only woman in the class. "Logging has consumed me."

 

In late June the novice loggers shipped their first batch of pulpwood, sending out a load weighing 25.7 tons.

 

Loggers traditionally have trained on the job, said Doug Duncan, executive director of the N.C. Association of Professional Loggers. But that is an expense for logging companies and a danger for new workers.

 

According to Forestry Mutual Insurance Co., 40 percent of logging injuries and fatalities occur within a worker's first 90 days on the job.

 

By offering a structured classroom and field environment, this course allows students to learn much more safely, Duncan said. And logging companies are unshackled from the time and expense of training a completely green recruit.

 

After finishing the course, the students "may not be polished gems, but we'll have knocked off the rough edges," Duncan said.

 

The economic downtown has hurt the logging industry, with North Carolina losing approximately 30 percent of its logging workforce over the last five years. The decrease in demand from the housing and furniture markets have been two of the biggest factors in the decline.

 

When there's no work, loggers find jobs in other fields. But bright spots in the timber market have recently materialized, producing the need for additional skilled workers.

 

Nontraditional markets, including those that export wood chips to make fiberboard, produce pine fluff for use in diapers and manufacture wood pellets to burn for electricity, are all on an upswing, Duncan said.

 

These newer markets, along with the expected return of the more traditional ones, mean that prepping workers now will mean dividends for years to come, for both logging companies and the workers.

 

"We need them right now," said Bryan Wagner of Forestry Mutual, who helps guide the class. "When the industry turns hot again, these guys will be ready to run with it."

 

Wagner recently led the class through a day of chainsaw basics on a timber tract in Bertie County. He explained the mechanics of the saw and how to use it to make a tree fall where you want it to. He impressed students by placing a short stick on the ground 30 feet from the trunk of a pine tree, then felling it directly on top of his tiny target.

 

Wagner explained how field crews operate, with truck and crane operators working alongside those with the chainsaws.

 

"It's invaluable to know how a crew works," Duncan said. "It's all integrated, like a ballet."

 

Matthew Harrell can't wait to get started on his new career. After serving in the military, working on farms and driving a truck, he's ready for a job that allows him to be home at night. As a truck driver, he often missed his wife.

 

"In a year's time, I saw her three or four weeks all together," said Harrell, 27.

 

Like many in the class, Harrell doesn't have a specific logging job in mind for when he graduates. Because the class will teach something about each part of working on a crew, he can make that decision when he completes the course.

 

"I'm up for anything that comes my way," Harrell said.

 

The logging class ships out its first load of logs for pulpwood.

 

New venture shakes up a dairy business


IMG 7196smallStanding outside Origin Food Group's yogurt facility in Iredell County, it's easy to see why the Stamey family built it where they did.

 

Their dairy cows are across the street.

 

As a result, the milk used to make Origin's new früsh yogurt shake is about as fresh as it can possibly be.

 

Stamey Farms has long been known for the strong genetics of its dairy herd. It routinely ships cows to international destinations.

 

That's how the Stamey family got to know the Alarcon family of Ecuador, who have their own thriving dairy operation. The Alarcons also have a successful business making a yogurt/fruit shake, which both families agreed could be successful here. They formed Origin to give it a go.

 

In other parts of the world, the dairy industry "is a more vertical business from the farm to retail," said Donald E. Greenlee, Origin's general manager. That is, the same people who own the cows also own the processing factories. They work directly with marketers and distributors to put their products in front of the consumer.

 

So that's what's happening at Origin, inside a refurbished truck stop just off Interstate 40 in Statesville. A $240,000 building reuse grant from the Rural Center helped to remake the truck stop into 17,000 square feet of laboratory and office space. Attached is a new 20,000-square-foot facility that houses the production aspects of the operation. Origin employs 25 people.

 

The $7 million facility opened in January 2012 with a ribbon-cutting attended by Gov. Beverly Perdue. The factory is now cranking out früsh, which is available at major grocery chains across the state. Four flavors of shakes are available: strawberry/banana, blueberry, peach and strawberry.

 

"The drinkable yogurt segment worldwide is tremendous," Greenlee said, noting that früsh is only the beginning. Origin is already looking into other products it could produce, perhaps eventually doubling its Statesville workforce.

 

"We are at the right place at the right time to really see tremendous growth," he said. "It will continue to grow as the business grows and we expand into other product lines."

 

Subcategories

Microenterprise Loan Program

 

Frequently asked questions

What does microenterprise mean?
What makes this program special?
You'll work with me when my bank won't?
Can I get free money to start my business?
How much can I borrow?

What if I need a larger loan?

Tell me more about standard loans.
Tell me more about express loans.
How much interest do you charge?
Do I have to put up collateral?
How long will I have to pay you back?
Do I have to be incorporated to borrow money?
How do I know if I qualify?

Can I use the loan to start a new business?

Will you lend me money to buy a business or a franchise?
My credit's not great because of some past mistakes. Can I still borrow money?
What if I can't pay you back?
How long before I can get my money?
If I apply and you turn me down, will that show up on my credit record?
If I apply, who else will see it?
Does the Rural Center offer other programs to assist entrepreneurs?

How do I apply?

What does microenterprise mean?
Microenterprises are our smallest businesses, commonly called mom-and-pop businesses. Often, microenterprise is just one, self-employed person, and usually it will have no more than 10 employees.

Return to the top

What makes this program special?
We work with people who have good ideas and sound character, but may have difficulty obtaining a loan from traditional sources. In addition, our most popular product — an express loan — can be approved within five business days. Program staff work one-on-one with potential borrowers to prepare loan applications based on the borrower's business plan, character and the local economy. Technical assistance is offered in partnerships with Small Business Centers at area community colleges or the Small Business and Technology Development Center of the UNC system.
Return to the top

You'll work with me when my bank won't?
Often, we can. We do this by working closely with you and incorporating business assistance into the loan process. 
Return to the top

Can I get free money to start my business?
We offer business loans, not grants. We charge interest and expect the loan to be paid back on time. Generally, you’ll find that grants are available only for government agencies or nonprofits, not for private, for-profit businesses.
Return to the top

How much can I borrow?
That varies. The maximum available through our program is $25,000. Express loans are capped at $5,000. If you already have a micro loan, you must pay it off in full before applying for a new loan.
Return to the top

 

  What if I need a larger loan?

We can direct you to other programs and lenders. Among them, our North Carolina Small Business Credit Initiative is helping traditional lenders make more capital available for startups and expansions. Another program that can open doors is the Capital Access Network, a state initiative to connect small and medium-size businesses with capital opportunities. Other sources are listed here.

Return to the top

 

Tell me more about standard loans.

Standard loans may be issued for up to $25,000. Repayment terms range from three to five years. Loan decisions are generally made within 10 to 20 business days of receiving an application (the same application is used for all microenterprise loans). Requirements increase with the size of the loan amount.

Return to the top


Tell me more about express loans.
Our most popular loan product, express loans may be issued for $500 to $5,000. Repayment terms range from one year to three years. Loan decisions are generally made within five business days of receiving a complete application (the same application is used for all microenterprise loans). Although the application process is abbreviated, you will still be expected to prove credit-worthiness. Requirements increase with the size of the loan amount.
Return to the top


How much interest do you charge?
The interest rate on standard and express loans is prime plus 4 percent. The interest rate on green loans is the current prime rate.
Return to the top

Do I have to put up collateral?
Yes. Acceptable forms of collateral include a vehicle title, equipment, inventory or a deed of trust.
Return to the top

How long will I have to pay you back?
The maximum loan term is five years. Your actual term will fall between one year and five years, depending on the amount of your loan.
Return to the top

Do I have to be incorporated to borrow money?
No. We fund any legal, for-profit entity, and many of our borrowers are sole proprietors.
Return to the top

How do I know if I qualify?
The only way to be sure is to apply. Our basic requirements are:

  • You wish to start or expand a small business.
  • Your business is located in one of the 85 rural counties of North Carolina.
  • Your business has fewer than 10 full-time employees.
  • You have a credit score of at least 575 with no outstanding judgments or liens.
  • You're at least 18 years old.
  • You're a U.S. citizen/permanent resident and resident of North Carolina.
  • Your total project cost does not exceed $50,000.
  • And, of course, you have to have a sound business idea.

Return to the top

 Can I use the loan to start a new business?

Yes. Most of our loans go toward start-ups. We also fund existing businesses.

Return to the top


Will you lend me money to buy a business or a franchise?
This is an acceptable use of a micro loan, but with a qualification. Our loan cap is $25,000, and your total project can cost no more than $50,000.
Return to the top


My credit's not great because of some past mistakes. Can I still borrow money?
We can work with you to improve your score. Before you're eligible for a loan, you'll have to get the score to at least 575 with no outstanding judgments or liens.
Return to the top

What if I can't pay you back?
When you take out a loan, you are expected to pay it back in full, with interest. The collateral you put up is security against the possibility of default. If your cash is short, we can claim the collateral property. This is an added reason for you to consider carefully before taking out a loan and to work hard to make sure your business succeeds.
Return to the top

How long before I can get my money?
The approval process for an express loan ($5,000 maximum) is five business days. Other loans generally require 10 to 20 business days for approval. Once approved, you should receive a check in about a week.
Return to the top

If I apply and you turn me down, will that show up on my credit record?
No information will show up on your credit report except an inquiry for credit.
Return to the top


If I apply, who else will see it?

All information contained in the pre-application and application will be kept strictly confidential and will not be used for any other purpose.
Return to the top

 

Does the Rural Center offer other programs to assist entrepreneurs?

Yes. For laid-off workers, Project GATE or Growing America through Entrepreneurship holds potential. It offers business coaching and training to help you get a business off the ground. Young adults 18 to 30 interested in starting a business may receive specialized assistance through the New Generation Ventures program. The Institute for Rural Entrepreneurship also may be able to refer you to useful resources in your community.

Return to the top

How do I apply?

You may apply to the Rural Center or work through one of our lending partners. The first step is to complete a pre-application. It will help us determine whether the Microenterprise Loan Program or another business finance option might best suit your needs. If a micro loan is a good option, we'll refer you to one of our 78 lending partners who will help you complete a full application. If you don't already have one, you'll also need to write a business plan. The Small Business Center Network of the N.C. Community College System offers business-planning guides for start-ups and established businesses. Other guides may also be found here.

Return to the top

 

 

 

Grant/Loan Applications and Reporting Forms

Welcome. For your convenience we have arranged all grant applications, reporting forms and related materials by program. You may scroll down the page to find the forms you need, or click on the name of the program you’re interested in. If you represent a nonprofit organization that received a Rural Center grant, please note the special section of Nonprofit Compliance Forms.


Building Reuse and Restoration Grants

Rural Hope

Microenterprise Loans
Community Development Corporation Grants
Economic Innovation Grants
N.C. Small Towns Economic Prosperity Grants

New Generation Initiative

OICs

Rural Community Mobilization Project
Water and Sewer Grants
Nonprofit Compliance Forms
Financial Request Form

Statement of No Overdue Taxes Form

 

 

Building Reuse and Restoration Grants


Payment request and progress report forms
Building Reuse/Rural Health Financial Request Form (Excel)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Financial Request Guidelines  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Progress Reporting Form  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health FINAL Reporting Form  (Word)
Building Reuse/Rural Health Job Verification Guidelines (Word)
Return to top of page

 

Microenterprise Loans

Microenterprise Pre-application and Credit Report Request (PDF)

Microenterprise Loan Application (Word)
Microenterprise Program Loan Cash Flow Form (Excel)
Return to top of page

 

Community Development Corporation Grants


Reporting forms

CDC Financial Request Form (Excel)

CDC Quarterly Progress Reporting Form (Word)

2013 CDC Match Report (Excel)

CDC Schedule of Due Dates (Excel)

2012 Year End Measuring Progress Report (Word)

2013 CDC Application Budget (Excel)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Return to top of page

 

Economic Innovation Grants

Reporting forms
Economic Innovation Grants Quarterly Progress Report (Word)

Economic Innovation Grants Final Report Template (Word)

Economic Innovation Grants Economic Impact Assessment Template (Word)
If applicable, also see Nonprofit Compliance Forms

See Financial Request Form

Return to top of page

 

N.C. Small Towns Economic Prosperity Grants

Reporting forms
Monthly Planning Report (Word)
Planning Final Report  (Word)

Monthly Implementation Report (Word)

Implementation Final Report (Word)

STEP Planning Financial Report Form (Excel)

STEP Implementation Financial Report Form (Excel)

STEP Match Report (Excel)

2012 STEP Planning Reporting Schedule (Excel)


Return to top of page

 

New Generation Initiative

Reporting forms

New Generation Careers program reporting requirements (Recorded webinar)

New Generation Leaders Budget Form (Excel)

New Generation Leaders Financial Request Form (Excel)

New Generations Leaders Match Report (Excel)

New Generations Leaders Match Report - Example (Excel)

New Generation Leaders Schedule of Due Dates (Word)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

 

Rural Community Mobilization Project

Reporting Forms

Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)

See Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Return to top of page

 

Water and Sewer Grants

Economic Infrastructure Program Payment Request and Progress Reporting Forms
Financial Payment Request Checklist for Grantees  (Word)
Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)
Quarterly & Final Report (Word)
Conflict of Interest Statement  (Word)
If applicable, also see Nonprofit Compliance Forms

 

Planning, Supplemental, Unsewered Communities Grant Programs

Financial Request and Reporting Form with instructions (Excel)
Financial Payment Request Checklist (Word)
Quarterly & Final Report (Word)
Conflict of Interest Statement (Word)
Capital Improvement Plan General Guideline (PDF)
Minority Business Statement from General Statute 143-128 (PDF)

Unsewered Communities Grant Program Only
Project Budget (Word)
Project Schedule (Word)

 

Nonprofit Compliance Forms

Certification and Sworn Statement (Word)
State Grants Compliance Reporting: Receipt of $25,000 or more (Word)
State Grants Compliance Reporting: Receipt of less than $25,000 (Word)
Program Activities and Accomplishments (Word)
Schedule of Receipts and Expenditures (Excel)
Return to top of page

 

Financial Request Form and Instructions

Financial Request Form and Instructions (Excel)

 

Statement of No Overdue Tax

Statement of No Overdue Tax Form (Word)

 

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Grant helps hardware store reclaim vacant building

Main Street building during renovationSCOTLAND NECK -- It was incredibly cheap -- just $6,000 -- but Isaac Hanff did not buy the crumbling, three-story building on Main Street because he could snap it up for less than what he'd pay for a used car.

 

Hanff is a Scotland Neck native who remembers when the town bubbled with the energy that steady factory paychecks provide. Bustling businesses lined the town's economic corridor.

 

The building he owns at 1000 Main Street over the years housed businesses that sold everything from clothes and appliances to horse carriages and caskets.

 

The decline of manufacturing and textiles has led to downtown becoming dotted with empty buildings. Hanff bought one of the largest ones, even though pigeons camped out on the third floor and holes in the roof had led to severe water damage. The building dates to the 1880s.

 

"I didn't want to see it fall down," he said.

 

With help from a $60,000 building reuse grant the Rural Center, Hanff worked to renovate the ground floor of the vacant eyesore into Hometown Hardware & General Store, which opened in 2011.

Hardware store operator Holten Williams

 

Scotland Neck Police Chief Joe D. Williams Jr. runs the business with this son, Holten. They sell hand-dipped ice cream, retro candies and pickled pigs feet alongside hammers and paint and building supplies, replicating the feel of an old-time mercantile center. 

 

With gasoline prices high, Williams said there is a market in town for people who don't want to drive to Roanoke Rapids or Tarboro to visit the nearest hardware store. "On those road trips, you're going to burn 50 miles to get a half-pound of nails," he said.

  

 Logging class trains next generation of cutters

 

Before he endeavored to start a new career, Wesley Jackson worked as a contractor installing satellite dishes. Working independently, it was up to Jackson to pay for all the supplies he needed to complete the installations, including the gasoline he put in his truck.

 

"I owed more money than I was making," said Jackson, who is 49. "At my age I'm looking for security and better benefits."

 

So Jackson signed up to learn the logging trade, enrolling in a 16-week class developed through a collaboration of the N.C. Association of Professional Loggers, Pitt Community College and the N.C. Agromedicine Institute. The Rural Center awarded the program $50,000 from the Rural Community Mobilization program, which assists community organizations connecting job-seekers with jobs – and sometimes with new career paths.

 

The Rural Center grant was combined with awards from the Golden LEAF Foundation and the Biofuels Center of North Carolina. Caterpillar Forest Products donated the use of heavy equipment. The grants enable students to enroll in the course tuition-free.

 


Each of the 14 students was unemployed when it began. The logging class consists of eight weeks of classroom sessions, which includes an emphasis onimproving students' money-management and job interview skills, followed by eight weeks in the forest. When they complete the course, students will be qualified for entry-level work as forest equipment operators.

 

The students expressed optimism about the future of the logging industry and their places in it.

 "When the industry turns hot again, these guys will be ready to run with it," says Bryan Wagner

"I like being outside. I like big trucks, to tell you the truth," said Donna Chaffee, who is 47 and the only woman in the class. "Logging has consumed me."

 

In late June the novice loggers shipped their first batch of pulpwood, sending out a load weighing 25.7 tons.

 

Loggers traditionally have trained on the job, said Doug Duncan, executive director of the N.C. Association of Professional Loggers. But that is an expense for logging companies and a danger for new workers.

 

According to Forestry Mutual Insurance Co., 40 percent of logging injuries and fatalities occur within a worker's first 90 days on the job.

 

By offering a structured classroom and field environment, this course allows students to learn much more safely, Duncan said. And logging companies are unshackled from the time and expense of training a completely green recruit.

 

After finishing the course, the students "may not be polished gems, but we'll have knocked off the rough edges," Duncan said.

 

The economic downtown has hurt the logging industry, with North Carolina losing approximately 30 percent of its logging workforce over the last five years. The decrease in demand from the housing and furniture markets have been two of the biggest factors in the decline.

 

When there's no work, loggers find jobs in other fields. But bright spots in the timber market have recently materialized, producing the need for additional skilled workers.

 

Nontraditional markets, including those that export wood chips to make fiberboard, produce pine fluff for use in diapers and manufacture wood pellets to burn for electricity, are all on an upswing, Duncan said.

 

These newer markets, along with the expected return of the more traditional ones, mean that prepping workers now will mean dividends for years to come, for both logging companies and the workers.

 

"We need them right now," said Bryan Wagner of Forestry Mutual, who helps guide the class. "When the industry turns hot again, these guys will be ready to run with it."

 

Wagner recently led the class through a day of chainsaw basics on a timber tract in Bertie County. He explained the mechanics of the saw and how to use it to make a tree fall where you want it to. He impressed students by placing a short stick on the ground 30 feet from the trunk of a pine tree, then felling it directly on top of his tiny target.

 

Wagner explained how field crews operate, with truck and crane operators working alongside those with the chainsaws.

 

"It's invaluable to know how a crew works," Duncan said. "It's all integrated, like a ballet."

 

Matthew Harrell can't wait to get started on his new career. After serving in the military, working on farms and driving a truck, he's ready for a job that allows him to be home at night. As a truck driver, he often missed his wife.

 

"In a year's time, I saw her three or four weeks all together," said Harrell, 27.

 

Like many in the class, Harrell doesn't have a specific logging job in mind for when he graduates. Because the class will teach something about each part of working on a crew, he can make that decision when he completes the course.

 

"I'm up for anything that comes my way," Harrell said.

 

The logging class ships out its first load of logs for pulpwood.

 

New venture shakes up a dairy business


IMG 7196smallStanding outside Origin Food Group's yogurt facility in Iredell County, it's easy to see why the Stamey family built it where they did.

 

Their dairy cows are across the street.

 

As a result, the milk used to make Origin's new früsh yogurt shake is about as fresh as it can possibly be.

 

Stamey Farms has long been known for the strong genetics of its dairy herd. It routinely ships cows to international destinations.

 

That's how the Stamey family got to know the Alarcon family of Ecuador, who have their own thriving dairy operation. The Alarcons also have a successful business making a yogurt/fruit shake, which both families agreed could be successful here. They formed Origin to give it a go.

 

In other parts of the world, the dairy industry "is a more vertical business from the farm to retail," said Donald E. Greenlee, Origin's general manager. That is, the same people who own the cows also own the processing factories. They work directly with marketers and distributors to put their products in front of the consumer.

 

So that's what's happening at Origin, inside a refurbished truck stop just off Interstate 40 in Statesville. A $240,000 building reuse grant from the Rural Center helped to remake the truck stop into 17,000 square feet of laboratory and office space. Attached is a new 20,000-square-foot facility that houses the production aspects of the operation. Origin employs 25 people.

 

The $7 million facility opened in January 2012 with a ribbon-cutting attended by Gov. Beverly Perdue. The factory is now cranking out früsh, which is available at major grocery chains across the state. Four flavors of shakes are available: strawberry/banana, blueberry, peach and strawberry.

 

"The drinkable yogurt segment worldwide is tremendous," Greenlee said, noting that früsh is only the beginning. Origin is already looking into other products it could produce, perhaps eventually doubling its Statesville workforce.

 

"We are at the right place at the right time to really see tremendous growth," he said. "It will continue to grow as the business grows and we expand into other product lines."

 

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