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LEADERSHIP

Campbell medical school captures interest

campbell 2BUIES CREEK -- When Campbell University began accepting applications for its under-construction medical school, it had no idea what to expect. Would students be interested in attending a brand new medical school in a tiny town in rural North Carolina?

 

As it turns out, plenty would. Since it began accepting applications on June 1, the school has receivedmore than 700 completed applications for the 150 spots in its inaugural class, which will start in the fall of 2013.

 

Campbell hopes that many of those future doctors will choose to practice in North Carolina, particularly in rural areas, said Britt Davis, the school's vice president of institutional advancement.

 

"Our entire focus and mission is to produce primary care physicians," he said, noting that as North Carolina's population has exploded in recent decades, the number of doctors its universities produce has not increased. "We graduate no more doctors than we did in 1981."

 

North Carolina's citizens, foundations and nonprofits have lined up behind the school's efforts to narrow that disparity. In the last year, Campbell has received more than $24 million in commitments for the medical school. The Rural Center awarded a $351,251 economic infrastructure grant for water and sewer lines. Golden Leaf and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust recently announced gifts of $2 million each.

 

Campbell will become the fifth university in the state to operate a medical school, joining the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Duke University, Wake Forest University and East Carolina University. Campbell will have the capacity to graduate 150 medical students a year, second only to UNC-CH, which can accommodate 180.

 

"Right off the bat we're going to be one of the largest programs in the state," Davis said.

 

The 96,500-square-foot, $60 million project is on schedule so far, with the facility to open in May 2013 so faculty and staff can set up shop. Students will begin to arrive a few months later.

 

The university estimates the school will help create more than 1,100 jobs during its first 10 years, helping spur an economic impact of more than $300 million.

 

campbell 3

 

The Rural Health Care Initiative

Rural Hope

 

The Rural Hope initiative is designed to spur economic activity and job creation in the health care sector while improving the availability and quality of health care services in rural communities.

 

See examples of previously funded projects. 

 

Frequently asked questions

Who is eligible to apply?

May grants be used for any type of health care facility?

What are eligible uses of grant dollars?

How much money is available for construction projects?

How do I apply?

Is there a deadline for applications? And when will we hear back?

 

Who is eligible to apply?

Eligible applicants are units of local government in partnership with private or nonprofit health care providers located within North Carolina’s 85 rural counties. Priority is given to towns with a population of fewer than 5,000 or to localities under severe economic distress.

 

May grants be used for any type of health care facility?

Eligible health care facilities include – but are not limited to – hospitals, urgent care centers, community and rural health centers, hospices, elder care facilities, public health departments, free clinics and offices of physicians, dentists, vision care specialists and mental health care providers. Priority is given to projects supporting a “resident company,” that is, a company that has paid unemployment taxes or income taxes in North Carolina and whose principal place of business is located here.

 

What are eligible uses of grant dollars?

Grants may be used to assist in the construction or renovation of new or existing health care facilities.

 

How much money is available for construction projects?

In Tier 1 and 2 counties, grants of up to $480,000 are awarded to shovel-ready projects, with actual funding amounts determined by the number of full-time jobs to be created and the total cost of the construction project. In Tier 3 counties the maximum award is $240,000. At least one job must be created for every $5,000 in grant funds requested. (The grant must be repaid if the jobs committed are not created and maintained for six consecutive months.) Grants must be matched by at least an equal amount in other public or private investment, with the local government contributing at least 5 percent of the grant amount.

 

How do I apply?

The application process involves two steps – a pre-application and then, for competitive projects, a full application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town of Marion

Though Marion is the largest municipality in the NC STEP program, it has lost both jobs and population as a result of the waning textile and furniture industries. Marion alone has lost more than 3,000 manufacturing jobs since 1990, as well as tax base and utility sales. It incurred millions of dollars in debt to provide water and sewer service to textile companies, and their closing strained its ability to repay its debt while maintaining essential town services. Through the NC STEP program, the town plans to market local goods, provide assistance to startup companies and bolster its infrastructure.

 

Snapshot before NC STEP

Marion's downtown won a listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the buildings are one- to four-story brick structures built after a fire destroyed the old town in the 1880s. The tightly configured downtown also includes four historic churches. Nearby, the historic train depot has been restored for community use.

Completion of the depot's restoration in 2005 spurred interest in other historic buildings. Several were purchased with a view toward restoration and creation of niche market businesses. Downtown also has been improved with period lighting and underground utilities, but traffic presents a problem. Main Street through downtown is a busy four-lane highway. As a result, pedestrian traffic is light and not inclined to linger, and storefronts have been converted into offices and service businesses.

A potential bright spot for the area is nearby Lake James. Despite the county's lagging economy, residential development on the lake is booming.

 

Goals through NC STEP

Marion has set its sights on downtown revitalization and entrepreneurial support with the NC STEP program. The leadership team has worked to develop Made in McDowell, a unique branding for local products designed to encourage support for local businesses. The town also plans to strengthen technological infrastructure and has established a mini-seed grant program to provide assistance to startup businesses. Through these and other initiatives, Marion aims to create sustainable employment and an improved mix of retail, service sector and high-tech businesses.

As it seeks growth, Marion also wants to protect its small town atmosphere by managed and planned development. Promoting denser development also will make better use of existing infrastructure. Special events will help pull the town together and encourage cultural diversity.

 

Visit the Marion website -- http://www.marionnc.org/

Marion if it were located in Plymouth


nc_step_marion

 

 

 

 

 

Sidebar Text

rroeoegogsdoxc
dfvdddvdo
iivaovfavda

Rural Hope

Round one grant awards


The Rural Center, the Golden LEAF Foundation and the N.C. Health and Wellness Trust Fund partnered in 2009 for the first round of Rural Hope grants. The organizations awarded nearly $6 million to 37 projects across the state, resulting in 525 new jobs and leveraging a total of $107 million in private and public funds.

 

Alleghany County

 

Alleghany County received a grant of $36,000 to renovate and upfit a vacant building in Sparta for a new dentistry practice. The new practice is the only facility within 50 miles accepting Medicaid patients. The project created three jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Ashe County

 

Ashe County received a grant of $360,000 to assist with the construction of an adult care home by Ashe Services for Aging in West Jefferson. The project created 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Ashe County received a grant of $36,000 to allow Ashe Memorial Hospital to renovate its existing facility to provide advanced radiology services. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Bladen County

 

The Town of White Lake received grants totaling $89,262 to renovate a vacant building to house White Lake Family Medicine. The project will create five jobs. Funders: Rural Center and Golden LEAF.

 

Caldwell County

 

Caldwell Memorial Hospital received a grant of $96,000 to renovate an adjacent office to expand its digital imaging department. The project will create eight jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

The Town of Hudson received a grant of $240,000 to help Caldwell Hospice and Palliative Care construct a 12-bed inpatient hospice facility and professional center. The project will create 20 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Camden County

 

Camden County received a grant of $168,000 to support the construction of a 15,000-square-foot building to house locations for Todd’s Pharmacy and Albemarle Family Practice. The project will create 14 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Carteret County

 

Carteret County received a grant of $32,500 to create a 10-room special care unit for Alzheimer’s patients at Snug Harbor on Nelson Bay, an assisted living facility. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Chatham County

 

XDS Inc. received a grant of $90,000 to help the mental health care provider relocate its operations to Chatham County. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Cherokee County

 

Cherokee County received a grant of $480,000 to help construct a 22,400-square-foot addition to the Andrews-based Industrial Opportunities Inc. facility, which provides developmental and vocational training to people with disabilities. The project will create 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

The Town of Murphy and Murphy Medical Center received grants totaling $184,000 to renovate a facility to house the hospital’s new urgent care center and family practice. The project will create seven jobs. Funders: Golden LEAF and Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Cleveland County

 

Cleveland County received a grant of $336,000 to support construction of a 16-bed detoxification facility for Pathways LME in Shelby. The company provides services related to mental health, developmental disabilities and substance abuse. The project will create 28 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Duplin County

 

The Town of Warsaw received a grant of $46,366 to allow Goshen Medical Center to expand its existing medical clinic. The project will create four jobs. Funder: Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Haywood County

 

Haywood County received a grant of $132,000 to construct a six-bed hospice facility. The project will create 11 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

The Town of Waynesville received a grant of $240,000 to renovate a manufacturing building for use by a nonprofit that serves people with disabilities. The project will create 24 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Henderson County

 

Henderson County received a grant of $150,000 to construct a medical facility to house a family practice, a pediatric practice and a mental health services office. The project will create 15 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Johnston County

 

Benson Area Medical Center received a grant of $60,000 to renovate its existing facility to accommodate a new physician, a pharmacist and three support staff. The project will create five jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Lenoir County

 

Lenoir County received a grant of $480,000 to support the construction of an 18-bed psychiatric residential treatment facility for NOVA Behavioral Healthcare Corp. The facility will provide medical and psychiatric services in a secure setting to children and youth with severe mental illness. The project will create 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Kinston Community Health Center received a grant of $100,000 to reconfigure its medical office to accommodate additional patients and services. The project will create eight jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Macon County

 

The Town of Franklin received grants totaling $82,747 to enable Angel Medical Center to expand and provide physicians’ services. The project will create seven jobs. Funders: Health & Wellness Trust Fund and Rural Center.

 

Martin County

 

The Town of Williamston received a grant of $36,000 to assist Martin General Hospital in the renovation of a vacant building for reuse as a physician’s office. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

McDowell County

 

McDowell County received a grant of $120,000 to construct a facility that will house a new family practice office and enable the relocation of an obstetrics and gynecology office. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Pender County

 

Pender County received a grant of $144,000 to help PORT Human Services build a nine-bed facility for the treatment of adolescents with mental health and substance abuse issues. The project will create 12 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Person County

 

The City of Roxboro received grants totaling $192,000 to expand Roxboro MedAccess Urgent Care to allow the company to provide primary care services. The project will create 16 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Robeson County

 

The City of Lumberton received a grant of $180,000 to construct an adult day center and administrative facility for an existing home health care company. The project will create 15 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Robeson County received a grant of $480,000 to renovate a vacant manufacturing building in Maxton for use by a home health care company. The company will expand its clinical and corporate services, creating 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Rutherford County

 

The Town of Spindale received a grant of $156,000 to renovate a former strip mall for reuse by an expanding dental practice. The project will create 13 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Sampson County

 

Sampson Regional Medical Center received a grant of $120,000 to construct a rural health center. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Scotland County

 

The City of Laurinburg received a grant of $144,000 to renovate existing hospital facilities to expand several of the hospital's medical departments. The project will create 12 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Stanly County

 

The City of Albemarle received a grant of $63,545 to renovate a former physician’s office for use by a dentist. The project will create six jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Stanly County received a grant of $331,441 to renovate a former medical facility for use as a residential mental health treatment facility. The project will create 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Surry County

 

Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital received a grant of $84,000 to renovate its existing facility and construct a new facility for the expansion of several of its departments. The project will create seven jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Transylvania County

 

Sisters of Mercy Urgent Care received a grant of $100,000 to purchase equipment for the center, which provides the county’s only cost-effective alternative to the hospital emergency department. The project will create five jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Vance County

 

Vance County received a grant of $360,000 to renovate a vacant building in Henderson for reuse by the Rural Health Group, a full-service community health center. The company will create 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Wayne County

 

Wayne County received a grant of $264,000 to expand a hospice facility to include a 12-bed residential wing. The project will create 22 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

 

 

 

Town of Marion

Though Marion is the largest municipality in the NC STEP program, it has lost both jobs and population as a result of the waning textile and furniture industries. Marion alone has lost more than 3,000 manufacturing jobs since 1990, as well as tax base and utility sales. It incurred millions of dollars in debt to provide water and sewer service to textile companies, and their closing strained its ability to repay its debt while maintaining essential town services. Through the NC STEP program, the town plans to market local goods, provide assistance to startup companies and bolster its infrastructure.

 

Snapshot before NC STEP

Marion's downtown won a listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the buildings are one- to four-story brick structures built after a fire destroyed the old town in the 1880s. The tightly configured downtown also includes four historic churches. Nearby, the historic train depot has been restored for community use.

 

Completion of the depot's restoration in 2005 spurred interest in other historic buildings. Several were purchased with a view toward restoration and creation of niche market businesses. Downtown also has been improved with period lighting and underground utilities, but traffic presents a problem. Main Street through downtown is a busy four-lane highway. As a result, pedestrian traffic is light and not inclined to linger, and storefronts have been converted into offices and service businesses.

 

A potential bright spot for the area is nearby Lake James. Despite the county's lagging economy, residential development on the lake is booming.

 

Goals through NC STEP

Marion has set its sights on downtown revitalization and entrepreneurial support with the NC STEP program. The leadership team has worked to develop Made in McDowell, a unique branding for local products designed to encourage support for local businesses. The town also plans to strengthen technological infrastructure and has established a mini-seed grant program to provide assistance to startup businesses. Through these and other initiatives, Marion aims to create sustainable employment and an improved mix of retail, service sector and high-tech businesses.

 

As it seeks growth, Marion also wants to protect its small town atmosphere by managed and planned development. Promoting denser development also will make better use of existing infrastructure. Special events will help pull the town together and encourage cultural diversity.

 

Visit the Marion website -- http://www.marionnc.org/

Marion if it were located in Plymouth


nc_step_marion

 

 

 

 

 

Sidebar Text

rroeoegogsdoxc
dfvdddvdo
iivaovfavda

LEADERSHIP

Campbell medical school captures interest

campbell 2BUIES CREEK -- When Campbell University began accepting applications for its under-construction medical school, it had no idea what to expect. Would students be interested in attending a brand new medical school in a tiny town in rural North Carolina?

 

As it turns out, plenty would. Since it began accepting applications on June 1, the school has receivedmore than 700 completed applications for the 150 spots in its inaugural class, which will start in the fall of 2013.

 

Campbell hopes that many of those future doctors will choose to practice in North Carolina, particularly in rural areas, said Britt Davis, the school's vice president of institutional advancement.

 

"Our entire focus and mission is to produce primary care physicians," he said, noting that as North Carolina's population has exploded in recent decades, the number of doctors its universities produce has not increased. "We graduate no more doctors than we did in 1981."

 

North Carolina's citizens, foundations and nonprofits have lined up behind the school's efforts to narrow that disparity. In the last year, Campbell has received more than $24 million in commitments for the medical school. The Rural Center awarded a $351,251 economic infrastructure grant for water and sewer lines. Golden Leaf and the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust recently announced gifts of $2 million each.

 

Campbell will become the fifth university in the state to operate a medical school, joining the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Duke University, Wake Forest University and East Carolina University. Campbell will have the capacity to graduate 150 medical students a year, second only to UNC-CH, which can accommodate 180.

 

"Right off the bat we're going to be one of the largest programs in the state," Davis said.

 

The 96,500-square-foot, $60 million project is on schedule so far, with the facility to open in May 2013 so faculty and staff can set up shop. Students will begin to arrive a few months later.

 

The university estimates the school will help create more than 1,100 jobs during its first 10 years, helping spur an economic impact of more than $300 million.

 

campbell 3

 

The Rural Health Care Initiative

Rural Hope

 

The Rural Hope initiative is designed to spur economic activity and job creation in the health care sector while improving the availability and quality of health care services in rural communities.

 

See examples of previously funded projects. 

 

Frequently asked questions

Who is eligible to apply?

May grants be used for any type of health care facility?

What are eligible uses of grant dollars?

How much money is available for construction projects?

How do I apply?

Is there a deadline for applications? And when will we hear back?

 

Who is eligible to apply?

Eligible applicants are units of local government in partnership with private or nonprofit health care providers located within North Carolina’s 85 rural counties. Priority is given to towns with a population of fewer than 5,000 or to localities under severe economic distress.

 

May grants be used for any type of health care facility?

Eligible health care facilities include – but are not limited to – hospitals, urgent care centers, community and rural health centers, hospices, elder care facilities, public health departments, free clinics and offices of physicians, dentists, vision care specialists and mental health care providers. Priority is given to projects supporting a “resident company,” that is, a company that has paid unemployment taxes or income taxes in North Carolina and whose principal place of business is located here.

 

What are eligible uses of grant dollars?

Grants may be used to assist in the construction or renovation of new or existing health care facilities.

 

How much money is available for construction projects?

In Tier 1 and 2 counties, grants of up to $480,000 are awarded to shovel-ready projects, with actual funding amounts determined by the number of full-time jobs to be created and the total cost of the construction project. In Tier 3 counties the maximum award is $240,000. At least one job must be created for every $5,000 in grant funds requested. (The grant must be repaid if the jobs committed are not created and maintained for six consecutive months.) Grants must be matched by at least an equal amount in other public or private investment, with the local government contributing at least 5 percent of the grant amount.

 

How do I apply?

The application process involves two steps – a pre-application and then, for competitive projects, a full application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Town of Marion

Though Marion is the largest municipality in the NC STEP program, it has lost both jobs and population as a result of the waning textile and furniture industries. Marion alone has lost more than 3,000 manufacturing jobs since 1990, as well as tax base and utility sales. It incurred millions of dollars in debt to provide water and sewer service to textile companies, and their closing strained its ability to repay its debt while maintaining essential town services. Through the NC STEP program, the town plans to market local goods, provide assistance to startup companies and bolster its infrastructure.

 

Snapshot before NC STEP

Marion's downtown won a listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the buildings are one- to four-story brick structures built after a fire destroyed the old town in the 1880s. The tightly configured downtown also includes four historic churches. Nearby, the historic train depot has been restored for community use.

Completion of the depot's restoration in 2005 spurred interest in other historic buildings. Several were purchased with a view toward restoration and creation of niche market businesses. Downtown also has been improved with period lighting and underground utilities, but traffic presents a problem. Main Street through downtown is a busy four-lane highway. As a result, pedestrian traffic is light and not inclined to linger, and storefronts have been converted into offices and service businesses.

A potential bright spot for the area is nearby Lake James. Despite the county's lagging economy, residential development on the lake is booming.

 

Goals through NC STEP

Marion has set its sights on downtown revitalization and entrepreneurial support with the NC STEP program. The leadership team has worked to develop Made in McDowell, a unique branding for local products designed to encourage support for local businesses. The town also plans to strengthen technological infrastructure and has established a mini-seed grant program to provide assistance to startup businesses. Through these and other initiatives, Marion aims to create sustainable employment and an improved mix of retail, service sector and high-tech businesses.

As it seeks growth, Marion also wants to protect its small town atmosphere by managed and planned development. Promoting denser development also will make better use of existing infrastructure. Special events will help pull the town together and encourage cultural diversity.

 

Visit the Marion website -- http://www.marionnc.org/

Marion if it were located in Plymouth


nc_step_marion

 

 

 

 

 

Sidebar Text

rroeoegogsdoxc
dfvdddvdo
iivaovfavda

Rural Hope

Round one grant awards


The Rural Center, the Golden LEAF Foundation and the N.C. Health and Wellness Trust Fund partnered in 2009 for the first round of Rural Hope grants. The organizations awarded nearly $6 million to 37 projects across the state, resulting in 525 new jobs and leveraging a total of $107 million in private and public funds.

 

Alleghany County

 

Alleghany County received a grant of $36,000 to renovate and upfit a vacant building in Sparta for a new dentistry practice. The new practice is the only facility within 50 miles accepting Medicaid patients. The project created three jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Ashe County

 

Ashe County received a grant of $360,000 to assist with the construction of an adult care home by Ashe Services for Aging in West Jefferson. The project created 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Ashe County received a grant of $36,000 to allow Ashe Memorial Hospital to renovate its existing facility to provide advanced radiology services. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Bladen County

 

The Town of White Lake received grants totaling $89,262 to renovate a vacant building to house White Lake Family Medicine. The project will create five jobs. Funders: Rural Center and Golden LEAF.

 

Caldwell County

 

Caldwell Memorial Hospital received a grant of $96,000 to renovate an adjacent office to expand its digital imaging department. The project will create eight jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

The Town of Hudson received a grant of $240,000 to help Caldwell Hospice and Palliative Care construct a 12-bed inpatient hospice facility and professional center. The project will create 20 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Camden County

 

Camden County received a grant of $168,000 to support the construction of a 15,000-square-foot building to house locations for Todd’s Pharmacy and Albemarle Family Practice. The project will create 14 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Carteret County

 

Carteret County received a grant of $32,500 to create a 10-room special care unit for Alzheimer’s patients at Snug Harbor on Nelson Bay, an assisted living facility. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Chatham County

 

XDS Inc. received a grant of $90,000 to help the mental health care provider relocate its operations to Chatham County. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Cherokee County

 

Cherokee County received a grant of $480,000 to help construct a 22,400-square-foot addition to the Andrews-based Industrial Opportunities Inc. facility, which provides developmental and vocational training to people with disabilities. The project will create 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

The Town of Murphy and Murphy Medical Center received grants totaling $184,000 to renovate a facility to house the hospital’s new urgent care center and family practice. The project will create seven jobs. Funders: Golden LEAF and Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Cleveland County

 

Cleveland County received a grant of $336,000 to support construction of a 16-bed detoxification facility for Pathways LME in Shelby. The company provides services related to mental health, developmental disabilities and substance abuse. The project will create 28 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Duplin County

 

The Town of Warsaw received a grant of $46,366 to allow Goshen Medical Center to expand its existing medical clinic. The project will create four jobs. Funder: Health & Wellness Trust Fund.

 

Haywood County

 

Haywood County received a grant of $132,000 to construct a six-bed hospice facility. The project will create 11 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

The Town of Waynesville received a grant of $240,000 to renovate a manufacturing building for use by a nonprofit that serves people with disabilities. The project will create 24 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Henderson County

 

Henderson County received a grant of $150,000 to construct a medical facility to house a family practice, a pediatric practice and a mental health services office. The project will create 15 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Johnston County

 

Benson Area Medical Center received a grant of $60,000 to renovate its existing facility to accommodate a new physician, a pharmacist and three support staff. The project will create five jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Lenoir County

 

Lenoir County received a grant of $480,000 to support the construction of an 18-bed psychiatric residential treatment facility for NOVA Behavioral Healthcare Corp. The facility will provide medical and psychiatric services in a secure setting to children and youth with severe mental illness. The project will create 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Kinston Community Health Center received a grant of $100,000 to reconfigure its medical office to accommodate additional patients and services. The project will create eight jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Macon County

 

The Town of Franklin received grants totaling $82,747 to enable Angel Medical Center to expand and provide physicians’ services. The project will create seven jobs. Funders: Health & Wellness Trust Fund and Rural Center.

 

Martin County

 

The Town of Williamston received a grant of $36,000 to assist Martin General Hospital in the renovation of a vacant building for reuse as a physician’s office. The project will create three jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

McDowell County

 

McDowell County received a grant of $120,000 to construct a facility that will house a new family practice office and enable the relocation of an obstetrics and gynecology office. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Pender County

 

Pender County received a grant of $144,000 to help PORT Human Services build a nine-bed facility for the treatment of adolescents with mental health and substance abuse issues. The project will create 12 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Person County

 

The City of Roxboro received grants totaling $192,000 to expand Roxboro MedAccess Urgent Care to allow the company to provide primary care services. The project will create 16 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Robeson County

 

The City of Lumberton received a grant of $180,000 to construct an adult day center and administrative facility for an existing home health care company. The project will create 15 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Robeson County received a grant of $480,000 to renovate a vacant manufacturing building in Maxton for use by a home health care company. The company will expand its clinical and corporate services, creating 40 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Rutherford County

 

The Town of Spindale received a grant of $156,000 to renovate a former strip mall for reuse by an expanding dental practice. The project will create 13 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Sampson County

 

Sampson Regional Medical Center received a grant of $120,000 to construct a rural health center. The project will create 10 jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Scotland County

 

The City of Laurinburg received a grant of $144,000 to renovate existing hospital facilities to expand several of the hospital's medical departments. The project will create 12 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Stanly County

 

The City of Albemarle received a grant of $63,545 to renovate a former physician’s office for use by a dentist. The project will create six jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Stanly County received a grant of $331,441 to renovate a former medical facility for use as a residential mental health treatment facility. The project will create 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center.

 

Surry County

 

Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital received a grant of $84,000 to renovate its existing facility and construct a new facility for the expansion of several of its departments. The project will create seven jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Transylvania County

 

Sisters of Mercy Urgent Care received a grant of $100,000 to purchase equipment for the center, which provides the county’s only cost-effective alternative to the hospital emergency department. The project will create five jobs. Funder: Golden LEAF.

 

Vance County

 

Vance County received a grant of $360,000 to renovate a vacant building in Henderson for reuse by the Rural Health Group, a full-service community health center. The company will create 30 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

Wayne County

 

Wayne County received a grant of $264,000 to expand a hospice facility to include a 12-bed residential wing. The project will create 22 jobs. Funder: Rural Center. Read more.

 

 

 

 

Town of Marion

Though Marion is the largest municipality in the NC STEP program, it has lost both jobs and population as a result of the waning textile and furniture industries. Marion alone has lost more than 3,000 manufacturing jobs since 1990, as well as tax base and utility sales. It incurred millions of dollars in debt to provide water and sewer service to textile companies, and their closing strained its ability to repay its debt while maintaining essential town services. Through the NC STEP program, the town plans to market local goods, provide assistance to startup companies and bolster its infrastructure.

 

Snapshot before NC STEP

Marion's downtown won a listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the buildings are one- to four-story brick structures built after a fire destroyed the old town in the 1880s. The tightly configured downtown also includes four historic churches. Nearby, the historic train depot has been restored for community use.

 

Completion of the depot's restoration in 2005 spurred interest in other historic buildings. Several were purchased with a view toward restoration and creation of niche market businesses. Downtown also has been improved with period lighting and underground utilities, but traffic presents a problem. Main Street through downtown is a busy four-lane highway. As a result, pedestrian traffic is light and not inclined to linger, and storefronts have been converted into offices and service businesses.

 

A potential bright spot for the area is nearby Lake James. Despite the county's lagging economy, residential development on the lake is booming.

 

Goals through NC STEP

Marion has set its sights on downtown revitalization and entrepreneurial support with the NC STEP program. The leadership team has worked to develop Made in McDowell, a unique branding for local products designed to encourage support for local businesses. The town also plans to strengthen technological infrastructure and has established a mini-seed grant program to provide assistance to startup businesses. Through these and other initiatives, Marion aims to create sustainable employment and an improved mix of retail, service sector and high-tech businesses.

 

As it seeks growth, Marion also wants to protect its small town atmosphere by managed and planned development. Promoting denser development also will make better use of existing infrastructure. Special events will help pull the town together and encourage cultural diversity.

 

Visit the Marion website -- http://www.marionnc.org/

Marion if it were located in Plymouth


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